Podcasting from International Waters on Royal Caribbean Liberty of the Sea

This is an unedited Facebook live event done from international waters while on the Podcast Cruise.  This is probably the first ever podcast transmitted live from a cruise ship in high seas.  February 2017

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The paradox of choice

Source: http://www.ted.com
By: Psychologist Barry Schwartz

Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz’s estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.
THE PARADOX OF CHOICE

I would like for you to consider if having more choices in your life makes it easier for you. Especially with money decisions. Today we are asked to make decisions on financial issues, but we have limited skills in this area- if any. We are asked to choose where we are going to place our hard earn money: in a 401k, 457 , TSP or 403b retirement system. What mutual fund is best for us is left up to us to decide. Most of us LEOs do not have the background or knowledge to make an educated decision and later we fail to reach our financial goals. Were we set up for failure as LEOs, or have we gotten to the point where no one wants to make a decision? Well folks, listen to Dr. Schwartz, share with other LEO/Military and let me know what you think.

Thanks,
THE PARADOX OF CHOICE
Commentary by: Felix A. Montelara
Author: Potencial Millonario

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Are You Feeling Rejected? If so, Never Give Up

By: Felix A. Montelara, Author: Bulletproof Finances & Potencial Millonario

Never Give Up!

IMG_4420
My Daughter Anya

I want to talk to you about rejection.  All of us have felt rejection before.  It can come into our lives in many different forms, such as when you don’t get the grade you want, the job you want, or even the girlfriend or boyfriend you want.  Many of the clients I talk to feel rejection with respect to money.  They feel that rejection when they try to get a loan, a mortgage, a credit report.  They feel rejection when they don’t have money for their bills, or when they can’t buy the things they want.  Rejection can often lead people to feel depressed, sad, or even hopeless.  I want to tell you about a few people who have been rejected in their lives.  Abraham Lincoln was one of the great presidents of the United States.  He actually ran for public office and was defeated seven times before he was elected president.   Think about the rejection he must have felt in each of those elections, after all the time and effort put into campaigning- just to lose again.  But Lincoln didn’t quit.  He was defeated, he was rejected, but he didn’t give up.  He kept going and he finally one.  Let me tell you about a person who was a reject from society. Abhram Lincoln  Let’s see if you can guess his name.  This guy was a teacher and preacher, but he was poor and never made much of a living at his work.  He had a small following and a group of close friends, but many of them abandoned him and rejected him when he needed them the most.  And then, worst of all, he was sent to help a nation of people, but they rejected him and called for him to be executed.  The very people he was trying to save chose to free a convicted criminal rather than him when they had the chance to free him.  After disparaging him, lying about him, selling his belongings, scattering his friends, and humiliating him, they finally watched him be killed when a court of law admitted that he had done no wrong.  Talk about the ultimate in rejection, the ultimate injustice.  Who was this man?  My friends, it was Jesus.  But even after all of this, even after being crucified on the cross, even after all of his suffering- did he give up?  Did he quit his mission?  Did he abandon all hope?  No, my friends, he didn’t.  He came back.  He was resurrected and came back victorious.  He finished teaching his disciples; he empowered them and sent them into the world to teach others.  And now we think of him as being the most influential man who ever lived.

So friends, when we are feeling rejected, let’s be rejects the way Abraham Lincoln and Jesus Christ were rejects.  Let’s be rejects who never give up.  Let’s be rejects who persevere and emerge victorious.

Are You Feeling Rejected? If so, Never Give Up

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How A USAA Customer Went From -$42,000 Debt to a +$25,000

By Felix A. Montelara
Source: USAA Magazine

As a member of USAA,  I am proud to say that this is a company dedicated to those who have served.  USAA does a great good at protecting our family through many of their products without taking us  toward bankruptcy. USAA Jones I saw an article in the USAA Magazine that caught my eye and I wanted to pay it forward. Here is the story of Angelo Jones who not only got out of $42,000 in debt (disaster) but managed to save $25,000 allowing Jones to participate of the “American Dream” of purchasing a home.

For the rest of the story click on the following link (Logo):

Note: I am a USAA happy customer and I am not being paid. Best regards, Felix A. Montelara, Author: Potencial MillonarioAmonzon Book cover  

 

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Financial Infidelity, Really?

By: The Potential Millionaire.net / LEO Edition

Source: USAA Magazine

Do you know someone who has committed Financial Infidelity?
Well here is the most important thing to do when avoiding falling into financial infidelity. “Share information.” for the rest of the story.

Read this article by clicking on photo.

Courtesy of USAA

 

 

 

 

Do you know Someone that has committed Financial Infidelity?  For more articles that can help your financial life visit; www.potentialmillionaire.net

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How Can I Create an Emergency Fund?

By:  Felix A. Montelara

Cash Emergency Fund
Cash Emergency Fund

I will discuss the importance of  creating and having an emergency fund, which is a separate savings account that is only used for emergencies.

law enforcement officers can greatly reduce stress, minimize  ethical matters, obtain security clearances, by creating an emergency fund.  It is reported that  the national salary estimate of police and sheriff’s officer is $58,720.  this is a gross estimate and those not include automatic deductions like, taxes, and health insurance costs.

Having an Emergency makes good personal financial sense specially if you have a family that depends on you.  It advise that is found in the Bible  as well.  Proverbs 13:11 states “Dishonest money dwindles away, but whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.”  This passage deals with two aspects of money management: how you earn your money and how you save it.

First, how is your money earned?  Do you work an extra part time job or several part time jobs?  You must know that when you do this you are trading your time for money. The trade may not be a bad choice f you balance it.  Times is one thing in this world you can’t get back.  Treading your time for money is a means of paying for material things: utilities, homes, clothing, etc.  It will not make a person happy by itself and can affect your life forever. Especially if you are missing out on lifetime events.

Creating an emergency fund can  be interpreted as working and saving a portion of your income more diligently, or it could mean carefully making a budget so you can stop wasting your money on unnecessary things.

Many families with money problems actually earn enough- they are just unaware of how they are wasting their money.  For example, do you know how much you spend on coffee, vending machine snacks, or personal appearance products each month?  Could some of that money be saved instead? And you can participate of the lifetime events you would have missed.   You would be surprised how much money you waste.  This is why it is so important to make an honest budget and to really be aware of all of your expenditures each month.  It is likely help you create an emergency fund and you could end richer each month if we chose to save rather than waste.

As Proverbs tells us- those who strive to use money carefully and wisely will be rewarded.

The reward for the careful gatherer of money is that it will grow.  When you begin your savings account, it may seem painfully small.  But the Bible encourages us to keep working at it.  With time, the savings will grow.  God may reward your diligence and care with other positive outcomes as well- but you will never reap those benefits unless you begin the correct way.

I encourage every law enforcement  officer to take a look at how you earn your money and how you save it.  You can’t begin an emergency fund or savings account until you understand where your money comes from and where it goes.

Keep in mind that as Proverbs says, “whoever gathers money little by little makes it grow.”  There is no shame in saving a dollar here or there, if that is all you can afford.  Be proud of yourself for gathering that dollar, caring for it, and storing it away.  This is how your money will grow, and this is how Scripture instructs us to act.

I have spent my share of money on “STUFF,”

My POV 1974 Scamp
My POV 1974 Scamp, Stuff , I still own.

I did not need but rather really wanted. Yes I needed some “R&R” and a reward once in while but you can go to far wasting money that you can save for your emergency fund that will reduce your stress and provide you with peace of mind.

Please leave me your comments and tell me that you how you are not wasting your time…

HOW TO CREATE AN EMERGENCY FUND?

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Why You Will Fail To Have A Great Career

Law enforcement officer are you pursuing your passion while doing your job. I surely have enjoyed my 32 years career in law enforcement. Is law enforcement your destiny? Is it your dream job? Are you afraid? Watch the video below, it will make think about your career. Go for it, just like I did. Do not be afraid to fail and you will have a great career.
Love it,
Felix A. Montelara
LEO, Author, Speaker, podcast and Radio Host

In this funny and blunt talk, Larry Smith pulls no punches when he calls out the absurd excuses people invent when they fail to pursue their passions. (Filmed at TEDxUW.)

Larry Smith, Professor of Economics, University of Waterloo
A professor of economics at the University of Waterloo in Canada, Larry Smith coaches his students to find the careers that they will truly love.

0:16I want to discuss with you this afternoon why you’re going to fail to have a great career. (Laughter)

0:25I’m an economist. I do dismal. End of the day, it’s ready for dismal remarks. I only want to talk to those of you who want a great career. I know some of you have already decided you want a good career.You’re going to fail, too — (Laughter) — because — Goodness, you’re all cheery about failing. (Laughter) Canadian group, undoubtedly. (Laughter) Those trying to have good careers are going to fail,because, really, good jobs are now disappearing. There are great jobs and great careers, and then there are the high-workload, high-stress, bloodsucking, soul-destroying kinds of jobs, and practically nothing in between.

1:11So the people looking for good jobs are going to fail. I’m going to talk about those looking for great jobs, great careers, and why you’re going to, why you’re going to fail. First reason is that no matter how many times people tell you, “If you want a great career, you have to pursue your passion, you have to pursue your dreams, you have to pursue, the greatest fascination in your life,” you hear it again and again and then you decide not to do it. It doesn’t matter how many times you download Steven J.’s Stanford commencement address, you still look at it and decide not to do it.

1:50I’m not quite sure why you decide not to do it. You’re too lazy to do it. It’s too hard. You’re afraid if you look for your passion and don’t find it, you’ll feel like you’re an idiot, so then you make excuses about why you’re not going to look for your passion. And they are excuses, ladies and gentlemen. We’re going to go through a whole long list, your creativity, and thinking of excuses not to do what you reallyneed to do if you want to have a great career.

2:13So, for example, one of your great excuses is, “Well, great careers are really and truly, for most people,just a matter of luck, so I’m going to stand around, I’m going to try to be lucky, and if I’m lucky, I’ll have a great career. If not, I’ll have a good career.” But a good career is an impossibility, so that’s not going to work.

2:37Then, your other excuse is, “Yes, there are special people who pursue their passions, but they are geniuses. They are Steven J. I’m not a genius. When I was five, I thought I was a genius, but my professors have beaten that idea out of my head long since.” (Laughter) Mm? “And now I know I am completely competent.” Now, you see, if this was 1950, being completely competent, that would have given you a great career. But guess what? This is almost 2012, and saying to the world, “I am totally, completely competent,” is damning yourself with the faintest of praise.

3:20And then, of course, another excuse: “Well, I would do this, I would do this, but, but, well, after all, I’m not weird. Everybody knows that people who pursue their passions are somewhat obsessive. A little strange? Mm? Mm? Okay? You know, a fine line between madness and genius. I’m not weird. I’ve read Steven J.’s biography. Oh my goodness. I am not that person. I am nice. I am normal. I’m a nice, normal person, and nice, normal people don’t have passion. Ah. But I still want a great career. I’m not prepared to pursue my passion, so I know what I’m going to do, because I have, I have a solution, I have a strategy. It’s the one Mommy and Daddy told me about. Mommy and Daddy told me that if I worked hard, I’d have a good career. So, if you work hard and have a good career, if you work really, really, really hard, you’ll have a great career. Doesn’t that, like, mathematically make sense?” Hmm. Not. (Laughter) But you’ve managed to talk yourself into that.

4:28You know what? Here’s a little secret. You want to work? You want to work really, really, really hard?You know what? You’ll succeed. The world will give you the opportunity to work really, really, really, really hard, but are you so sure that that’s going to give you a great career when all the evidence is to the contrary?

4:49So let’s assume, let’s deal with those of you who are trying to find your passion. You actually understand that you really had better do it, never mind the excuses. You’re trying to find your passion,and you’re so happy. You found something you’re interested in.

5:07I have an interest! I have an interest! You tell me. You say, “I have an interest!” I say, “That’s wonderful!And what, what are you trying to tell me? That you — ” “Well, I have an interest.” I say, “Do you have passion?” “I have an interest,” you say. Your interest is compared to what? “Well, I’m interested in this.”And what about the rest of humanity’s activities? “I’m not interested in them.” You’ve looked at them all, have you? “No. Not exactly.”

5:35Passion is your greatest love. Passion is the thing that will help you create the highest expression of your talent. Passion, interest — it’s not the same thing. Are you really going to go to your sweetie and say, “Marry me! You’re interesting.” (Laughter) Won’t happen. Won’t happen, and you will die alone. (Laughter)

6:02What you want, what you want, what you want, is passion. It is beyond interest. You need 20 interests, and then one of them, one of them might grab you, one of them might engage you more than anything else, and then you may have found your greatest love in comparison to all the other things that interest you, and that’s what passion is.

6:25I have a friend, proposed to his sweetie. He was an economically rational person. He said to his sweetie, “Let us marry. Let us merge our interests.”

6:38(Laughter)

6:40Yes he did. “I love you truly,” he said. “I love you deeply. I love you more than any other woman I’ve ever encountered. I love you more than Mary, Jane, Susie, Penelope, Ingrid, Gertrude, Gretel — I was on a German exchange program then.” (Laughter) “I love you more than — ” All right! She left the room halfway through his enumeration of his love for her. After he got over his surprise at being, you know,turned down, he concluded he’d had a narrow escape from marrying an irrational person, although he did make a note to himself that the next time he proposed, it was perhaps not necessary to enumerateall of the women he had auditioned for the part. (Laughter)

7:34But the point stands. You must look for alternatives so that you find your destiny, or are you afraid of the word “destiny”? Does the word “destiny” scare you? That’s what we’re talking about, and if you don’t find the highest expression of your talent, if you settle for “interesting,” what the hell ever that means, do you know what will happen at the end of your long life? Your friends and family will be gathered in the cemetery, and there, beside your gravesite will be a tombstone, and inscribed on that tombstone, it will say, “Here lies a distinguished engineer who invented Velcro.” But what that tombstone should have said, in an alternative lifetime, what it should have said if it was your highest expression of talent, was, “Here lies the last Nobel Laureate in Physics, who formulated the Grand Unified Field Theory and demonstrated the practicality of warp drive.”

8:36(Laughter) Velcro, indeed. (Laughter)

8:42One was a great career. One was a missed opportunity. But then, there are some of you, in spite of all these excuses, you will find, you will find your passion, and you’ll still fail.

9:03You’re going to fail, because, because you’re not going to do it, because you will have invented a new excuse, any excuse to fail to take action, and this excuse I’ve heard so many times. “Yes, I would pursue a great career, but I value human relationships more than accomplishment. I want to be a great friend. I want to be a great spouse. I want to be a great parent, and I will not sacrifice them on the altar of great accomplishment.”

9:50(Laughter)

9:52What do you want me to say? Now, do you really want me to say now, tell you, “Really, I swear I don’t kick children.” (Laughter) Hmm? Look at the worldview you’ve given yourself. You’re a hero no matter what, and I, by suggesting, ever so delicately, that you might want a great career, must hate children. I don’t hate children. I don’t kick them. Yes, there was a little kid wandering through this building when I came here, and no, I didn’t kick him. (Laughter)

10:23Course, I had to tell him that the building was for adults only and to get out. He mumbled something about his mother, and I told him she’d probably find him outside anyway. Last time I saw him, he was on the stairs crying. (Laughter) What a wimp. (Laughter)

10:39But what do you mean? That’s what you expect me to say. You really think, you really think it’s appropriate that you should actually take children and use them as a shield? You know what will happen someday, you, you ideal parent, you? The kid will come to you someday and say, “I know what I want to be. I know what I’m going to do with my life.” You are so happy. It’s the conversation a parent wants to hear, because your kid’s good in math, and you know you’re going to like what comes next.Says your kid, “I have decided I want to be a magician. I want to perform magic tricks on the stage.”(Laughter)

11:23And what do you say? You say, you say, “Umm … that’s risky, kid. Might fail, kid. Don’t make a lot of money at that, kid. You know, I don’t know, kid, you should think about that again, kid, you’re so good at math, why don’t you — ”

11:39And the kid interrupts you, and says, “But it is my dream. It is my dream to do this.” And what are you going to say? You know what you’re going to say? “Look kid. I had a dream once, too, but — but.” So how are you going to finish the sentence with your “but”? “… But. I had a dream too, once, kid, but I was afraid to pursue it.” Or, are you going to tell him this? “I had a dream once, kid. But then you were born.” (Laughter)

12:14(Laughter) (Applause)

12:16Do you, do you really want to use your family, do you really ever want to look at your spouse and your kid and see your jailers? There was something you could have said to your kid when he or she said, “I have a dream.” You could have said, looked the kid in the face, and said, “Go for it, kid, just like I did.”But you won’t be able to say that because you didn’t. So you can’t. (Laughter)

12:59And so the sins of the parents are visited on the poor children. Why will you seek refuge in human relationships as your excuse not to find and pursue your passion? You know why. In your heart of hearts, you know why, and I’m being deadly serious. You know why you would get all warm and fuzzyand wrap yourself up in human relationships. It is because you are — You know what you are.

13:37You’re afraid to pursue your passion. You’re afraid to look ridiculous. You’re afraid to try. You’re afraid you may fail. Great friend, great spouse, great parent, great career. Is that not a package? Is that not who you are? How can you be one without the other? But you’re afraid.

14:07And that’s why you’re not going to have a great career, unless — unless, that most evocative of all English words — unless. But the unless word is also attached to that other, most terrifying phrase, “If only I had … ” “If only I had … ” If you ever have that thought ricocheting in your brain, it will hurt a lot.

14:48So, those are the many reasons why you are going to fail to have a great career, unless …

15:00Unless.

15:04Thank you. (Applause)

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Frugal or just Plain Cheap!

By  

Source| Yahoo! Finance

To call Dan Nainan frugal is an understatement. He lives in New York City, home to the world’s largest public transit system, but insists on walking. Everywhere. Sometimes for miles on end. When he travels he prefers to couch-surf, and don’t be fooled if you see him at Starbucks. He’s not ordering any lattes. He just stays for the free Wi-Fi.

Oh, and did I mention he’s a millionaire?

“There are two ways to become a millionaire. You either make a lot of money or be a frugal person,” says Nainan. “I’ve kind of combined those.”

Also see: Daily Habits of the Wealthy

In fact the 32-year-old has managed to save a whopping $1.6 million nest egg despite quitting his day job as a software developer five years ago to pursue stand-up comedy. He says what began as a hobby now earns him tens of thousands of dollars per appearance — money that mostly goes to savings.

“In my business, you never know when the phone will stop ringing. There are so many entertainers who are more successful and famous than I am, but they end up poor because they throw all that money away,” he says. “It’s very important to save for my retirement.”

Pay Little to Travel

Even if he gets a generous travel stipend, Nainan keeps his journeys cheap. “I took a $1 bus to Boston for a show I was paid $10,000 to do. I use Couchsurfing.com and AirBnB.com to stay for $60 a night or even free. Instead of taking a car to the airport, I take the AirTrain. A 10-ride ticket is only $25. ”

Respect Your Roots

“I’m half Indian and half Japanese. Both cultures are extremely, extremely frugal. Indians are especially known for being unbelievable tightwads. I guess it’s in my blood.”

Never Buy New

A self-described “gadget freak,” Nainan shops for electronics on eBay, often scoring items for one-fifth their price, and frequents the library for the latest best-seller and even language-lesson CDs. “I don’t buy new furniture. That’s for suckers. There are many people who put stuff on Craigslist, and then as their moving day approaches, they get desperate and give it away for free. That’s how I got…a bedroom full of furniture,” he says.

Do as the Millionaire Next Door

His million-dollar lifestyle may seem counterintuitive, but it’s pretty much by the book as described in Thomas Stanley’s best-seller, The Millionaire Next Door. After all, being frugal pays. Nainan spends no more than $10 on haircuts and $15 on dress shirts. And those run-down sunglasses? He’s had them for five years and counting.

No-Gifts Policy

Another way he saves? Nainan refuses to buy gifts for family and friends. “I’ve trained my friends and family for years not to expect anything from me and, more importantly, not to give me anything. There isn’t really anything I need. I live pretty simply.”

Nainan’s lifestyle is up for debate, but it’s clear that his choices have earned him millionaire status. Is it worth it? 

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Do you Know The Millionaire Next Door?

The Millionaire Next Door accumulates 100’s of interviews within wealth ranking neighborhoods and discovers the habit so many of these wealthy individuals share. *A must read for success. I’ve provided the full audio book of the novel for you to listen to.

You will need about 8:45 hour to listen to this audio. If you do complete the audio book it will lead you to succeed with money. The authors of  The Millionaire Next Door make it clear that high income does not equal wealth. Want to learn more? Enjoy the audio book below. If you can afford it buy the book. it has great information that will lead you to financial freedom.

Felix A. Montelara

Book Synopsis:

In this New York Times best-selling book, The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy, Dr. Thomas J. Stanley uses over two decades worth of surveys, personal interviews with millionaires, and data to reveal the secrets for building wealth in America.Amonzon Book cover

In The Millionaire Next Door, Dr. Stanley shattered the contemporary held beliefs about America’s rich – and how they got that way. It is seldom inheritance or advanced degrees or even intelligence that builds fortunes in this country. Wealth in America is more often the result of hard work, diligent savings, and living below your means. The Millionaire Next Door reveals the common denominators that show up again and again among those who have accumulated wealth.

Over 2 million copies of The Millionaire Next Door have been sold. And the book appeared on The New York Times best seller list for over three years. Based on interviews with Dr. Stanley, numerous articles about The Millionaire Next Door appeared in such publications as Fortune, Forbes, Money, U.S. News and World Report, The Limbaugh Letter, The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and People Magazine. Dr. Stanley also profiled the typical millionaire next door while he was a featured guest on ABC’s 20/20, The Today Show, and The Opra Winfrey Show.

 

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